Blue or White Face

Blue is a recessive gene that removes all yellow, red, pink, and orange pigments from the feathers and leaves the blue, black, brown, and gray pigments.

 

In some species the blue gene is referred to by other names.  In cockatiels it is called "White face" because the removal of the yellow and orange produces exactly that; a white face. In Green Cheeked Conures the blue mutation is usually called "turquoise." This is unfortunate as it leads to confusion with "parblue" mutations in other species which are commonly called turquoise as well, but are different from the true blue mutation that we see in Green Cheeks.

 

 

Hamilton, an adult blue male Indian Ringneck making me smile

Hamilton, an adult blue male Indian Ringneck making me smile

Front: Buddy and Delta, two blue Green Cheeked Conures, with Flick and Beret in the back, two normal Green Cheeked Conures.

Front: Buddy and Delta, two blue Green Cheeked Conures, with Flick and Beret in the back, two normal Green Cheeked Conures.

A young blue male Indian Ringneck on the left next to a mature normal male on the right. Photo courtesy of Itchyfeet.

A young blue male Indian Ringneck on the left next to a mature normal male on the right. Photo courtesy of Itchyfeet.

Blue male Parrotlet. Photo courtesy  of TJ's Parrotlets

Blue male Parrotlet. Photo courtesy  of TJ's Parrotlets

Elvis, an adult male whiteface Cockatiel. Note how the usual yellow and orange of the face has been removed just like other blue mutations. The gene works the same way even though the result is a grey bird rather than a blue one.  Photo courtesy of Parrotlover2001.

Elvis, an adult male whiteface Cockatiel. Note how the usual yellow and orange of the face has been removed just like other blue mutations. The gene works the same way even though the result is a grey bird rather than a blue one.  Photo courtesy of Parrotlover2001.

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